Monthly Archives: January 2012

Libday8: the Cataloguers

Here’s a list of people with catalog(u)ing / metadata / systems roles who have signed up for Library Day in the Life Round 8. It’s a rough list, put together from the descriptions people gave on the libday wiki page supplemented by people who contacted us letting us know they were taking part. If you’re involved in something catalog(ue)-related and want to be added here and to our twitterlist, let us know.

If we’ve included you here and you don’t think we should have; let us know.
[Edited 8pm, Monday 30th Jan to add 3 more cataloguers]

Image: DC Hero Minifigs (most of them) by Julian Fong. Copyright Commons, some rights reserved.

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Library Day in the Life

Library Day in the Life is a fantastic project, now in its 8th round collecting information about librarians’ daily work through blogs, tweets and photos.

We’d love to see more posts about cataloguing and related matters this time – please let us know if you’re signing up and have cataloguing / metadata / systems duties, and we’ll post a round up at the end of the week.

Attitude versus skills

Happy 2012 to all the high visibility cataloguers out there! Here at HVCats HQ, we have great plans for this year, starting with a post hoping to generate some debate.

This guest post is from Robin Armstrong-Viner, Head of Collection Management at the University of Kent. It’s an interesting look at how to go about recruiting in a time of almost continuous change, with a bonus job advert at the bottom if anyone’s jobhunting at the moment.  What do you think? What is most important now, specific defined skills or the attitude of the person recruited in the face of changing times? How do you describe what you’re looking for to make sure you get the right candidates? And what skills and attitudes should cataloguers be looking to in their professional development (#catcoders, I’m looking at you – post to follow about that!). Over to Robin…

Like many (if not all) HE institutions the University of Kent is experiencing a period of rapid change. The most obvious driver is the increase in tuition fees for new entrants later this year but there are a number of reasons for this. The need for the University to offer an inspiring student experience and produce innovative world-leading research while operating in an effective, efficient, sustainable and professional manner (three of the key messages from the University’s Plan for 2009-12) creates significant challenges for Information Services including Library Collections.

During 2012-13 we expect to see transformational change within Library Collections as we review each of our core processes including the selection, acquisition, cataloguing, classification, processing, delivery, preservation and disposal of learning and research materials in all formats. We are fortunate in being able to recruit a Project Manager to help lead and support these projects working with the teams involved but there has been much discussion about what should be included in the person specification for that role.

Most of the discussion has been around how to find someone with the right attitude. Naturally job descriptions tend to focus on specific tasks and skills, but is this the best approach in a period of uncertainty and change? What are the skills associated with innovation? Can you write a job description around attitudes such as being keen to explore new ideas and develop new skills? Is it appropriate to demand that candidates are not only comfortable with technology but eager to exploit it to achieve its maximum potential? How do you attract advocates and champions?

And where does this leave traditional library skills? Should a formal qualification in librarianship be an essential criterion? By making it one would we risk creating a barrier to those outside the profession (or even those within it but who haven’t ever taken that final step) who could bring the very attitudes and approaches we need? An understanding of library processes, MARC, etc would help, but could someone who has been involved in process improvement and the transformation and repurposing of data in other contexts use that experience to benefit us?

I don’t know that we’ve found the answer (yet!) but we’ve had a go in the job description we’ve created at http://tinyurl.com/8yrpzgp. And if you’re a High Visibility Cataloguer who is looking for a challenge we’d love to receive an application from you!

#catbkchat 2012?

Last year we had a successful twitter-based cataloguing book club chat (#catbkchat) about the newly-published Conversations with catalogers in the 21st century (Libraries Unlimited, 2011).

It was an interesting initiative, and we all had the best of intentions to follow it up, perhaps with a free publication.

Life got in the way, and it’s 2012 already, with no more cataloguing book club discussions. New year, new resolutions and all that. I’m working on a review of Michael Gorman’s autobiography, Broken pieces: a library life, 1941-1978 (ALA, 2011). It’s not free, but it’s bound to be in libraries on both sides of the Atlantic, and Gorman is, of course, both an iconic cataloguer (editor of AACR) and a writer who has been unafraid to spark debate throughout his long and distinguished career.

If we were to plan a new #catbkchat, would people be interested? Would this be a good (and accessible) title to choose? When would be a good time to do it? February? March? The book is 207 pages long, and, like all Gorman’s work, an easy read.

Perhaps leave a comment here if you would be interested, with an idea of whether you would prefer a day in February or March and which day of the week. Friday, perhaps?